Ensuring Your Small Business is a Success

April Boone

The time you spend working in your business has value. And that is a value that you should always consider when calculating the success of your business. The time you spend is a real number just like the supplies you buy.


There are many ways that you can determine whether your small business is doing well. You can track your profits, run a stock-check, work out your marketing success, and so on and so forth. However, the best method to ensure that you’re in the black (or green, as is the money.) is to calculate your ROI. Say what?

ROI is an acronym for Return On Investment. Whether you’re business is doing well, or will continue to do well using your present products and marketing techniques, is a matter that is decided by your ROI. This is why it is extremely important that the ROI is calculated in the right manner. Most small business owners tend to calculate their ROI disregarding hidden expenses, and in fact, disregarding their own time. You are working at your business, right? Doesn’t the amount of time you spend on it count? Of course it does.

Basically, the ROI is a ratio of the return of money directly generated by your marketing and the total amount of resources used for it. In simpler terms, your Return on Investment is calculated by taking the net amount of your business returns and dividing that by the total resources invested into it.

Figuratively:

ROI = (Payments from Investment – Cost of Investment) / (Cost of Investment)

Miscalculating your ROI can lead to you feeling falsely secure because your small business is doing well, when it actually isn’t. This is why, when getting your ROI, you must include all resources used, most important of which is your time. When small business owners calculate this ratio, some may actually feel they’re better off working full-time.

If you’ve just opened up your business, your ROI is bound to be quite low. This shouldn’t discourage you. However, if your ROI is still low after two years, it may be time for a change of products, or marketing techniques. And if it’s still low after ten yearsArticle Search, then you’re better off getting a better pay for your hours elsewhere.

Get more about small business issues at FreelanceSprout.com.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

April Boone is the owner of Global Marketing Solutions in Foley Alabama.

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